• Anna

Normal-ish


I visit cancer centers for my job on a daily basis, ironic huh? Most of the people I speak to don't know I have cancer but I'm good with that. This past week I was speaking to a social worker about her role in a patient's cancer journey and I ended up sharing with her that I myself have Stage 4 cancer. I could see her eyes and demeanor change as she shifted into 'social worker' gear. I told her that after this last scan I have felt more at ease knowing that my tumors have had little to no growth over the last two years; 'still stable' gave me a boost of hope. I told her that I was now trying to view my cancer as more of a chronic disease. This is my new normal, navigating a 'normal-ish' life knowing I have cancer.


On a podcast this week a cancer survivor said that while going through treatment, people would call her 'warrior' and 'strong' but she was just doing what she needed to do to survive. She said that integrating back into real life AFTER the tests and treatments was actually more difficult because there was no handbook, no one scheduling a test or bloodwork; she faced mortality and life became more 'simple'. Simple meaning being grateful, loving others, being kind, appreciating time minus all the b.s. and drama and complaining and stressors that don't really matter in the end. This is my mind daily, integrating into everyone's normal daily life but having a more simple mindset because with metastatic cancer nothing is 'normal' living anymore. I can't forget I have several cancerous nodules in my lungs and I can't pretend that I don't think they're ever going to grow. How do I navigate normal and not really normal on a daily? Advice appreciated but I'll start with grateful. Most of the time I view life as simple like the podcast chick, on occasion I get swept up in the drama but then I remember that life is fleeting.


How long is a long life? In a few months I'll be turning 50, FIFTY!! I've technically lived a long life already. How do I want to live the rest? Warrior strong and not tinged with sadness and cynicism that having cancer can sometimes bring. Simple. Intentional. Grateful.

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